Actors

Actors

Adam Nawojczyk

Adam Nawojczyk

A graduate of the Acting Department of the Ludwik Solski Academy for the Dramatic Arts in Kraków (1996).
1 September 1996 – 31 December 1996 – The Juliusz Słowacki Theatre, Kraków
1 September 1997 – The Stary Theatre, Kraków
Adam Nawojczyk epitomises perfect, modern acting – brilliant, ironic, formal. He began his career by working with leading directors – Krystian Lupa and his students: Grzegorz Jarzyna, Krzysztof Warlikowski and Paweł Miśkiewicz. His roles in Lupa’s plays (including the Behemoth in “The Master and Margarita”, Pope-Ondine in “Factory 2” and Mathew/the Snake in “Zarathustra”) have been described by Jacek Poniedziałek as follows: ‘Krystian Lupa has finally managed to achieve something he has been dreaming of, and fighting with the actors at the Stary Theatre for throughout the past dozen or so years – a natural authenticity in their onstage presence, and courage to leave their roles and enter the unknown’. He fit excellently into Garbaczewski’s provocative “Gallery of Polish Kings” (Henryk Walezy), Marcin Liber’s play which took a critical stance on Poland’s political transformation, “Being Steve Jobs” (Horn/Fatti), and in Jan Klata’s philosophical peregrination, “The Road to Damascus” (Cezar). In “blogi.pl”, a play inspired by internet creativity, he plays ‘a delightful hermaphrodite, changing his voice from a man’s to a woman’s, using exaggerated gestures, balancing between a demonstration of effeminacy and a flexing of male muscles – wittily, elegantly and spectacularly’ (Jacek Sieradzki, A Subjective List of Theatre Actors). In the play “The Undivine Comedy: I’M GONNA TELL GOD EVERYTHING!”, he has full control over the audience as ‘Papa Wincenty – a despotic aristocrat, the spitting image of Krasiński senior. The harshest and most cynical words in the entire play fall from his lips. In Demirski’s production, he becomes a symbol of ruthless politics conducted according to the principle of “divide and rule”, conducting business with a Jewish capitalist above the heads of the despised rabble’ (Łukasz Badula).

Konstantin Bogomolov entrusted the main female role to this actor in his “Platonov,” based on Chekhov: “The pivotal stage tactic is undoubtedly the gender reversal – the actresses play male characters, and the men play females. (…) With the leveling of all the moments when sparks fly between men and women, things get far more fascinating on stage, as when, for example, Adam Nawojczyk’s Anna Voynitzev (the General’s wife) has one of her moods. One of her feminine moods, one would like to say, but the role reversal serves to show that moods and emotions have no gender,” concluded Agnieszka Dziedzic in Teatralia.

Awards

2015 – S. Wyspiański Award
2008 – 7th World Premiere Festival in Bydgoszcz – acting award for his role in “Blogs.pl”

In the Theatre

In the repertoire

Others